Mentoring Program

The Snowflakes are Falling - Opus 32

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"The Snowflakes are Falling" is a cello and piano duet in the key of C. This piece is about snowflakes falling at different speeds, and how I imagine they would sound.
Grade Level: 5
Intended For: Live Instrument Performance
Software Used: Noteflight
Instrumentation: Cello, Piano
Key: C
Meter Signature: 4/4
Tempo: 100
Status: Work in Progress
Noteflight URL: Website Title

Comments   

#20 Erik Nielsen 2017-04-03 15:11
Dear Cyrus,
Thanks for entering your piece for Opus 32. Unfortunately, it was not chosen for performance. However, I congratulate you on the work you put into it. I enjoyed mentoring you, and encourage you to keep composing. I look forward to seeing more work from you in the future.

Best wishes,
Erik
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#19 Erik Nielsen 2017-03-30 10:53
Dear Cyrus,
Thanks for posting the final version of your score. You really did a lot of work on this since last time. I like that you've added some chords in the piano. Congratulations on all your work. I hope you learned something about the process of composing and look forward to seeing more of your work in the future.

Best wishes,
Erik
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#18 Cyrus Johnson 2017-03-30 09:27
I added more on to the piece.
I think i am all done.
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#17 Erik Nielsen 2017-03-24 11:01
Dear Cyrus,
Thanks for your latest posting. I'm glad to see that you've added some dynamics. Let me talk about the piano dynamics for a second.
Usually, we only put dynamics in between the hands. We don't need the mp below the left hand in bar 1, nor in bar 10, and I don't see why both hands can't play at the same dynamic at bar 6. That is, put either mf or mp in between the hands and get rid of the dynamic below the left hand. Also, the piano never plays p or f. Nor are there any crescendi or decrescendi. I think you can do more.

I'm also reprinting my comments from last time:
1. The repeated notes in the piano right hand in bars 15-16 aren't very interesting. In bar 15 I'd change the second D (at the beginning of beat 2) to an E. In bar 16 I'd change the first E (at the end of beat 3) to a D.
2. The cello still isn't an equal partner in this piece. Why not give some of the scale material to the cello? Better yet, why not lengthen the scale section to have both cello and piano playing scales in different directions, as I suggested last time?
3. To answer your question from earlier, yes, please lengthen the piece, especially the middle (bars 14-17). There's a lot more you can do before you go to the ending.

Cyrus, yes, you've added a few dynamics and that's good, but you can do more. It would be great if you worked outside class, but whatever you do, remember that the final version is due next Thursday, the 30th. Please let me know if you have questions.

Best wishes,
Erik
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#16 Cyrus Johnson 2017-03-23 09:14
I added in more dymamics.
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#15 Erik Nielsen 2017-03-22 15:03
Dear Cyrus,
I know you and your classmates only meet on Thursdays, but I just want to let you know that final versions of Opus 32 works are due by midnight next Thursday, March 30. Please let me know if you have questions. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Best wishes,
Erik
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#14 Erik Nielsen 2017-03-16 16:12
Dear Cyrus,
Thanks for posting your two comments and the latest revision of your duet for cello and piano. I'm glad to see you're experimenting with the scales. Let me make a few suggestions.
1. The repeated notes in the piano right hand in bars 15-16 aren't very interesting. In bar 15 I'd change the second D (at the beginning of beat 2) to an E. In bar 16 I'd change the first E (at the end of beat 3) to a D.
2. The cello still isn't an equal partner in this piece. Why not give some of the scale material to the cello? Better yet, why not lengthen the scale section to have both cello and piano playing scales in different directions, as I suggested last time?
3. To answer your question from earlier today, yes, please lengthen the piece, especially the middle (bars 14-17). There's a lot more you can do before you go to the ending.
That's it for today, Cyrus. Keep working. You have two weeks left until the deadline. Please ask me questions if you have them. I look forward to your next posting.

Best wishes,
Erik
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#13 Cyrus Johnson 2017-03-16 09:18
I up dated the c scale let me know what you think.
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#12 Cyrus Johnson 2017-03-16 09:07
Should i add more?
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#11 Erik Nielsen 2017-03-14 14:53
Dear Cyrus,
Thanks for posting your question. Let me see whether I can help you. I'd say that shortening the scale part of your piece as you've done in bars 14-16 is already an improvement over what you had before. How about if you gave the bar 14 scale to the cello (down an octave and in bass clef), the bar 15 scale to the piano (where it is now) and then for bar 16 you gave the cello a scale going up starting on middle C and in treble clef (the same as what you have in bar 14 in piano now), while the piano right hand did the scale coming down at the same time (as it is now)? That would make it more lively and interesting.
Cyrus, I hope this helps you to figure out something to do next and to be able to think of other things to lengthen your piece. Please let me know if you have questions. I look forward to your next posting.

Best wishes,
Erik
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